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Jill Jess Phythyon
KU News Service
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Commencement to proceed as scheduled

Fri, 05/17/2013

LAWRENCE  — About 4,000 graduates are expected to take part in the traditional walk through the Memorial Campanile and down the Hill at the University of Kansas during the 141st annual Commencement on Sunday, May 19, at Memorial Stadium.

Stadium gates will open at 9 a.m. Graduates and faculty will gather on Memorial Drive at 10 a.m. and will begin the walk down Mount Oread at 10:30 a.m.

Wes Jackson, founder of The Land Institute and advocate for sustainable agriculture, will be the featured speaker. Jackson is one of three 2013 recipients of KU honorary degrees, along with dancer and choreographer Karole Armitage and artist and educator Wendell Castle.

The ceremony will be live streamed and can be viewed at the Woodruff Auditorium in the Kansas Union and at commencement.ku.edu.

In the event of inclement weather, an announcement will be made at 9 a.m. about arrangements for a delayed ceremony. The announcement will be made public at:

  • alert.ku.edu; twitter.com/kunews, twitter.com/kugrads
  • kuinfo.ku.edu
  • Knology Cable Channel 6
  • Radio stations KJHK (FM 90.7), KPR (FM 91.5), KLZR (FM 105.9), WIBW (AM 580), KMBZ (AM 980) and KLWN (AM 1320)
  • On cell phones of students who have signed up to receive alert notifications.

If weather conditions improve by late morning, the ceremony will be at 12:30 p.m. Graduates will assemble on Memorial Drive at noon.

For information and detailed schedule of events visit commencement.ku.edu.

A list of candidates for degree and their hometowns will be posted Friday, May 17, at news.ku.edu.



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Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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